Category Archives: Midwest

Publisher Just Offered a Discount!

I just received an email from the publisher of my forthcoming book, Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs, and in order to get the word out, they are offering a discount to people who buy directly from them — 30 percent off!

Here are the details:

SPECIAL OFFER
30% DISCOUNT OFFER OFF LIST PRICE PLEASE ORDER USING THIS CODE: RLFANDF30

Order directly through Rowman & Littlefield at https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781538110744 for a 30% discount on Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs. Use promotion code RLFANDF30 at checkout for 30% off – this promotion is valid until December 31, 2019. This offer cannot be combined with any other promo or discount offers.

978-1-5381-1074-4 • Hardback $36.00 list price (sale price $25.20)
Available October 2018
* Discount code can be used with eBook purchases, when available. (and ebooks will be available)

978-1-5381-1074-4
Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs
after discount: $25.20

Discount applies to this ISBN only |Offer expires December 31, 2019 and may not be combined with other offers
• Shipping and handling: U.S.: $5 first book, $1 each additional book | Canada: $6 first book, $1 each additional book, plus applicable Canadian sales tax | International orders: $10.50 first book, $6.50 each additional book
FIVE CONVENIENT WAYS TO ORDER:
• Online: https://Rowman.com
•Call toll-free: 1-800-462-6420
•Email: orders@rowman.com.
• Fax toll-free: 1-800-338-4550
• Mail to: Rowman & Littlefield, 15200 NBN Way,
PO Box 191
Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214-0191
All orders from individuals must be prepaid / Prices are subject to change without notice/ Please make checks payable to Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group

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Filed under Agriculture, Farming, Food, Heartland Hogs, History, Literature, Midwest, pork

New Book Coming

While this blog is titled Midwest Maize, after my first book of food history, it will have to do for future food history and Midwest-oriented books, as I can’t quite imagine starting a new blog with every book.

Which is why I’m using it to introduce my next book: Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs: From Wild Boar to Baconfest. The book won’t be out for a couple of months, but it is already on Amazon, with a few reviews and the option of pre-ordering. So in case you thought I might have stopped studying after I wrote about corn, I didn’t.

Pigs were once known as cornfields on legs, because the easiest way to get pigs to market was to feed it to pigs and then let the pigs walk to market. So the connection between pigs and corn in the Midwest dates to the earliest settlement of the region. However, the history of humans and pigs dates back a lot longer than that–current estimate is 12,000 years of association. So there are a lot of tales of pigs through history, from the Celts inventing bacon to the Etruscans leading herds by playing trumpets. But the book isn’t all history. There are visits to farms and interviews with experts ranging from swine technicians to butchers and chefs to waste management specialists. There are some iconic regional recipes. And there are lot of the kinds of fun facts that make food history so enthralling.

On top of entertaining folks, I’m hoping this book will contribute to closing the gap between what people think about food and how it actually gets to us. There are a tremendous number of really good, decent, dedicated people working very hard to make sure you don’t starve. Come and meet a few of them in my books.

You can check it out here: Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs.

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Filed under Agriculture, Corn, Culture, Farming, Food, History, Literature, Midwest, Midwest Maize, Thoughts

I Get To Talk Corn on the Radio

Radio station WDCB FM (90.9 in Chicagoland) invited me to talk about corn for their Sunday-morning show First Light. The interview actually lasted quite a bit longer than the 15 minutes that finally got broadcast, but I think it still gets across that corn is a very fun topic. (Though I was surprised the show’s charming host, Brian O’Keefe, left out the story about the invention of corn puffs.) If you have any interest in hearing what I shared, they’ve posted the broadcast on their website: https://www.wdcbfirstlight.org/news/2017/9/24/youll-see-corn-differently

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Filed under Agriculture, Corn, Culture, Food, History, Language, Midwest, Midwest Maize

Where to Eat in Chicago

While folks on the coasts sometimes denigrate, or at least dismiss, the Midwest, the Heartland is a glorious region with a rich history. It also happens to be where you’ll find the metropolis that Condé Nast Traveler has identified as the nation’s top restaurant city: Chicago. But with more than 12,000 restaurants, how do you know where to eat? Well, if you want to eat fabulously, from top flight to low-cost gems, you could not do better than to go with Michael Gebert, James Beard Award-winning food writer and videographer. If you’re wondering how you can get Gebert to show you around town, he has already solved that problem, with his dandy little book, The Fooditor 99–a slim but insightful guide book to his 99 favorite Chicago restaurants.

Cuban, Thai, Ukrainian, Japanese, Mexican, French, American, barbecue, small plates, seafood, sandwiches, dim sum, diner, and lots more, are listed by cuisine, by location in the city, and in the order Gebert delights in them. Gebert not only guides you to great places, he even helps you figure out what to order when you’re there. So if you’re interested in grazing your way through some of the most interesting food in the Windy City, The Fooditor 99 is a mighty useful way to explore the glories of the town’s dining scene. Yum.
Cover-Fooditor99.jpg

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Filed under Culture, Food, Midwest, Travel

E-Z Pop

In the 1950s, Benjamin Coleman of Berkley, Michigan, invented a fuss-free method of making popcorn. The popcorn was packed in its own pan and had a foil tent that expanded as the popcorn popped. If the first thing that comes to mind when you hear that description is Jiffy Pop, you could be forgiven for the error, since it became better known, but Coleman’s product, marketed by the Taylor Reed Corporation, was called E-Z Pop.

Five years after E-Z Pop hit the market, inventor Frederick Mennen of LaPorte, Indiana, created a similar device and called it Jiffy Pop. American Home Products bought Mennen’s creation in 1959, and soon took it national. Not too surprisingly, Taylor Reed sued, because the products were so similar. Initially, they won the suit, but it was later overturned. Apparently, the two products were just enough different to satisfy a judge. E-Z Pop began to fade from the scene. (In all fairness to Mennen, almost every invention in history had lots of people working on the same idea at the same time. Nothing arises in a vacuum. Popcorn was popular and making it more accessible was on many minds.)

Though E-Z Pop vanished, a few of us remember the name (my mom even remembers buying it) and the ads, which ran into the ‘60s. Playing on the rhyme of pop and bop, E-Z Pop used a jazzy presentation for their creation.

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Filed under Corn, Culture, History, Midwest, Uncategorized, Video

DeBoer’s Bakkerij-Restaurant

Part two of the Holland, Michigan, visit was on the way home. I had read about saucijzenbroodjes, a Dutch specialty that translates sausage in bread but which is more commonly rendered “pig in a blanket.” The “blanket” in the case of this dish is wonderful, flaky pastry.

And in case you’re wondering if they take the Dutch presence in the area seriously.

I had found reviews online, and what I’d read was confirmed by folks at Windmill Island: DeBoer’s Bakkerij (Bakery) would be a great place to try this dish.

This proved to be true. The pig in a blanket was tasty, and the split pea soup served with it was the most flavorful, ham-filled pea soup I’ve ever had.

A tasty lunch, and a fun way to reaffirm the continuation of Dutch culture and traditions in the region.

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Filed under Culture, Food, Midwest, Travel

2017 Eric Hoffer Award

The Eric Hoffer Awards for 2017 were announced yesterday. This is an award designed to recognize exceptional writing from small, academic, or independent publishers that don’t usually get the attention that the big publishing houses get. While Midwest Maize didn’t get the top prize, I was awarded an Honorable Mention, which, given the thousands of books submitted, is still gratifying.

Eric-Hoffer-Award-Seal.gif

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Filed under Agriculture, Corn, Culture, Farming, Food, History, Language, Literature, Midwest, Midwest Maize, Recipe, Thoughts, Uncategorized